Supported by broadcaster Kate Humble and the Soil Association, The Good Life Project is a ground-breaking research project and wellbeing programme evidencing the impact of nature on human health, wellbeing and behaviour.

Through published research, training programmes and exploring nature’s impact on people’s mental functioning, social relationships and physical wellbeing, the Project encourages greater interaction with nature, to create scientifically-proven healthier and happier environments at work and in education.

"I grew up in the countryside but had something of a 'nature deficit' when I lived and worked in London for twenty years. I discovered that having less contact with the outdoors - Oxford Street didn't count! - and with nature and all its seasonal changes made me feel restless, disconnected and unhappy. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that tells us having contact with nature is good for us and our sense of well-being and I would certainly back that up, but if the research this project undertakes is able to prove that, it will be to the great advantage to everyone. I wish it every success and will be intrigued and excited to read its findings."
Kate Humble Broadcaster (BBC’s Springwatch, Autumnwatch and Animal Park)

The impact of nature on people is well documented; just some of the many benefits of being in the presence of, or simply viewing nature, include reductions in stress, anxiety, blood pressure, anger and exhaustion, whilst increasing energy levels, cognitive functioning and happiness. The Good Life Project exists to demonstrate the efficacy of restorative environments and to encourage corporate responsibility in this area.

Our on-going research into the cognitive and emotional impact of nature in the working environment provides real-world, evidence-based suggestions, supported by data, for how organisations can achieve this with simple and cost-effective strategies.

"The Good Life Project is shining a welcome light on the relationship between workplace wellbeing and exposure to the natural world. We know the value of providing employees with healthy, fresh, seasonal food in the workplace, and we look forward to the results of this ground-breaking research, which will provide necessary insights into the additional benefits of fresh air at lunchtime and communal food growing activities. The implications for businesses could be significant."
Rob Percival Policy Officer, the Soil Association

However, despite evidence supporting the positive benefits of the exposure to nature, many organisations still prohibit personalising desk space, the presence of plants and displaying pictures and posters, for example.

According to research published by Persil/Unilever* in 2016, 75% of children in the United Kingdom spend less time outside than prison inmates, yet it is nature that ties and binds us to our planet.

You can get involved with our research projects in a number of ways: individuals can come along to our information days and courses run at the farm and for organisations we offer assistance in introducing natural stimuli into working environments, monitoring staff responses, providing training, resources, guidance and support.

We offer consultancy services and full training programmes for HR directors, learning and development managers and culture and wellbeing leads. Please contact us for further details. Click here to download the Growing Your Ideal Work Environment brochure.

 

 

 

*Persil/Unilever, Singer, D. and Singer, J. Children and Nature 2016

"The Good Life Project is an inspiring one that throws light on a very important subject. It aims to demonstrate something I and many others already believe: that health and wellbeing are intricately bound up with our surroundings, and that a closer connection to the natural environment can improve and enrich our working lives. If we are happier and healthier at work, of course that has huge benefits for the rest of our lives too, so I very much look forward to seeing results of this research and the new directions they could lead us in."
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Food writer and environmental campaigner (River Cottage)

Meet the Faculty
Jez Rose
Jez Rose

Behaviourist specialising in behaviour change

Dr. Lynda Shaw, PhD
Dr. Lynda Shaw, PhD

Cognitive neuroscientist specialising in emotion

Professor Marc Salem, PhD
Professor Marc Salem, PhD

Psychologist

Elizabeth Gloyens
Elizabeth Gloyens

Psychologist specialising in behaviour planning

Amy Brann
Amy Brann

Neuroscience Consultant